Indie Review: The God King by James A West

It seems that most of the Indie books I’m reading are fantasy–and there’s a reason for that. I enjoy writing fantasy, but I admit it’s not my favourite genre to read. Apart from Tolkein and Robert E. Howard, I don’t read a lot of it. Mostly, that’s because I find a lot of fantasy to be ponderous and overwrought. Epic. The great thing about Indie writers, though, is that they write fantasy because they love it. They write what they want to write, not what the publisher thinks will sell. And because of this, the writing (in my opinion) tends to be better.

Enter James A. West. I came across The God King while browsing for free books, and got hooked early on. This is Epic Fantasy at its best. The concept is simple, but captivating: a prince wants more power than he has, and is willing to go to any lengths for it. Of course, he gets more than he’s bargained for–but the nicer twist is that an Everyman Character is granted that power too, and must act as a counterpart to the prince, with precisely zero will to do so. This sets up a satisfying and complex conflict that flavours the book and saves it from being just another ponderous fantasy adventure tale.

We have three main characters; the aforementioned Prince Varis, his Everyman counterpart Kian, and the wonderfully named Ellonlef, Kian’s love interest. This is a nice triad that works well with the conflict posed in the book; while Kian and Ellonlef are obviously on the same side, Varis is much more powerful than either of them. What should be an unstable “two against one” handicap is actually very well balanced. I felt that our protagonists were up against insurmountable odds–which should absolutely be the case in a good story–but that their friendship gave them an edge that Varis lacks.
What’s more, this isn’t a clear good vs evil story. Kian is obviously on the side of right, while Varis is not–but our villain isn’t as much of one as you’d think.  He’s certainly not the stereotype who wants power just because, and to a certain extent he even has a good reason for what he’s doing. He’s not evil for the sake of being evil–he’s evil because his desires run amok and he has no choice but to move forward. Of course, he’s set up as an antagonist, and so Kian and Ellonlef seem convinced that he is completely evil, and must be stopped at all costs. I always talk about stakes: they’re certainly here, as far as our protagonists are concerned.
The really great thing about this, though, is that we as readers get an insight our heroes don’t. We see the foibles Varis has, the very human mistake he makes. We see him shake in fear with the powers he’s unleashed, and his insecurity as to just what he should do with his powers. He’s definitely bitten off more than he can chew, but there’s nothing he can do to stop it now. I got the impression that but for the grace of god, he would have been the hero of the story. A villain of circumstance.

The prose of this book is very good. West has a talent for excellent description–though almost too good in places. He’s got an impressive vocabulary, which is great for any writer, but there were points where it seemed that every noun was coupled with an adjective. It ran against the old writer’s adage of “show, don’t tell;” in being overly descriptive it becomes difficult for the reader to experience the world on their own. This isn’t really a large issue, however; after the opening pages, it fades into the background and didn’t interfere with my enjoyment of the book.
And the reason for that is the wonderful World West has created for this book. It’s incredibly vibrant, and I had no trouble nestling into to it even in the opening pages. There are several cultures in the World that are well rounded, even if we only see hints of them; castes and kingdoms which aren’t explored but are still described well enough that they seem complete. There’s also a detailed history that’s hinted at here and there, but feels complete without any gaps. And best of all, the religion of the World is well crafted. Competing beliefs make the world seem real, and the characters more human. I particularly like the way he’s able to combine religious dogma and science; for example, there are three moons in the sky, and the people believe they represent three gods. When the moons are destroyed, it has a crippling effect on the faiths of the people. This kind of chthonic religion is natural and realistic. At the same time, West makes it clear that this has a very real scientific effect on the world; you can’t remove the gravitational effect of a moon and be surprised when the sky starts falling.

There’s a lot to like about this book–but on the other hand, there’s something flat underlying it all. It’s nothing I can put my finger on, but I think it has something to do with the well developed World and Characters as opposed to the relatively simple plot. The story involves Varis reaching for this insurmountable power, then trying to take over the realm, while Kian and company chase him down to defeat him. Aside from some setbacks our heroes suffer along the way, it’s pretty straight forward. There’s nothing wrong with this, of course–it’s still an engaging story–but there’s a clear contrast here. The World and Characters are great examples of how fantasy should be done, while the plot is a pretty straight line from beginning to end. It’s also a rather lengthy book, and although there were parts that could probably have been left out without much trouble, it wasn’t padded, and there wasn’t anything that seemed gratuitous. One thing I really enjoyed about the was the book was written was that the last several chapters are significantly shorter than the preceding ones; this gives the climax of the book a nice staccato feel, and really serves the action well. A nice trick, and a great narrative choice.

All in all, this is a fun book. It’s the first book in a series, and though the next book doesn’t seem to expand on these characters, it’s sure to flesh out the world even more–I’m quite looking forward to it. You can find it on Amazon for $0.99, or on Kobo for free. James A. West is on Twitter, and keeps a blog as well. If you like epic fantasy, this is an Indie Writer to watch out for!

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One comment on “Indie Review: The God King by James A West

  1. You’ve piqued my interest, James! I’ll have to go check this one out.

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